Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-Q

 

(Mark one)

 

x      QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 24, 2011

 

Or

 

o         TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from            to            

 

Commission file number: 000-50307

 

FormFactor, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

13-3711155

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

7005 Southfront Road, Livermore, California 94551

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

 

(925) 290-4000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes x  No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of the Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes x  No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated filer o

 

Accelerated filer x

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer o

 

Smaller reporting company o

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o  No x

 

As of October 20, 2011, 50,460,810 shares of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share, were outstanding.

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

FORMFACTOR, INC.

 

FORM 10-Q FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED SEPTEMBER 24, 2011

 

INDEX

 

Part I.

Financial Information

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements (Unaudited):

 

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010

3

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 24, 2011 and December 25, 2010

4

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010

5

 

 

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

6

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

22

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

34

 

 

 

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

34

 

 

 

Part II.

Other Information

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

34

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

34

 

 

 

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

35

 

 

 

Item 6.

Exhibits

36

 

 

 

Signatures

 

37

 

 

 

Exhibit Index

 

38

 

2


 


Table of Contents

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements (Unaudited)

 

FORMFACTOR, INC.

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,
2011

 

September 25,
2010

 

September 24,
2011

 

September 25,
2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

$

52,115

 

$

47,347

 

$

139,101

 

$

144,653

 

Cost of revenues

 

40,141

 

54,541

 

113,168

 

150,244

 

Gross profit (loss)

 

11,974

 

(7,194

)

25,933

 

(5,591

)

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

10,423

 

12,825

 

32,861

 

43,913

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

11,200

 

16,219

 

34,741

 

52,810

 

Restructuring charges, net

 

258

 

8,539

 

197

 

14,603

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

100

 

55,402

 

451

 

56,401

 

Total operating expenses

 

21,981

 

92,985

 

68,250

 

167,727

 

Operating loss

 

(10,007

)

(100,179

)

(42,317

)

(173,318

)

Interest income, net

 

335

 

623

 

1,128

 

2,120

 

Other income (expense), net

 

(75

)

3,960

 

135

 

3,995

 

Loss before income taxes

 

(9,747

)

(95,596

)

(41,054

)

(167,203

)

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

 

157

 

231

 

(2,048

)

672

 

Net loss

 

$

(9,904

)

$

(95,827

)

$

(39,006

)

$

(167,875

)

Net loss per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and Diluted

 

$

(0.20

)

$

(1.90

)

$

(0.77

)

$

(3.35

)

Weighted-average number of shares used in per share calculations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and Diluted

 

50,747

 

50,431

 

50,719

 

50,136

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3



Table of Contents

 

FORMFACTOR, INC.

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share and per share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

September 24,
2011

 

December 25,
2010

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

140,933

 

$

121,207

 

Marketable securities

 

175,099

 

226,028

 

Restricted cash

 

 

383

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

29,142

 

28,598

 

Inventories

 

20,647

 

25,003

 

Deferred tax assets

 

304

 

329

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

11,250

 

14,743

 

Total current assets

 

377,375

 

416,291

 

Restricted cash

 

297

 

297

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

34,872

 

37,311

 

Deferred tax assets

 

7,417

 

5,445

 

Other assets

 

3,987

 

6,710

 

Total assets

 

$

423,948

 

$

466,054

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

18,120

 

$

14,948

 

Accrued liabilities

 

14,170

 

24,045

 

Income taxes payable

 

 

1,894

 

Deferred revenue

 

5,960

 

4,637

 

Total current liabilities

 

38,250

 

45,524

 

Long-term income taxes payable

 

4,155

 

4,248

 

Deferred rent and other liabilities

 

4,205

 

5,081

 

Total liabilities

 

46,610

 

54,853

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 16)

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value:

 

 

 

 

 

10,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding at September 24, 2011 and December 25, 2010, respectively

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value:

 

 

 

 

 

250,000,000 shares authorized; 50,460,810 and 50,587,917 shares issued and outstanding at September 24, 2011 and December 25, 2010, respectively

 

52

 

52

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

655,449

 

651,263

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

2,983

 

2,027

 

Accumulated deficit

 

(281,146

)

(242,141

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

377,338

 

411,201

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

423,948

 

$

466,054

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4



Table of Contents

 

FORMFACTOR, INC.

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(39,006

)

$

(167,875

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

8,593

 

24,720

 

Amortization of investments

 

385

 

340

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

9,661

 

13,371

 

Deferred income tax benefit

 

(2,513

)

(87

)

Recovery of doubtful accounts receivable

 

(266

)

(717

)

Provision for excess and obsolete inventories

 

4,867

 

6,754

 

Loss (gain) on disposal of long-lived assets

 

(31

)

443

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

451

 

56,402

 

Non-cash restructuring

 

(1,582

)

8,717

 

Gain on release of secured borrowing

 

 

(3,481

)

Foreign currency transaction gains

 

(542

)

(206

)

Changes in assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

453

 

(4,664

)

Inventories

 

(581

)

(13,987

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

2,524

 

1,276

 

Refundable income taxes

 

(12

)

26,357

 

Other assets

 

1,896

 

57

 

Accounts payable

 

3,262

 

(2,297

)

Accrued liabilities

 

(9,390

)

1,665

 

Income tax payable

 

(1,253

)

(418

)

Deferred rent

 

(11

)

(832

)

Deferred revenues

 

1,322

 

(3,820

)

Net cash used in operating activities

 

(21,773

)

(58,282

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of property, plant and equipment

 

(4,874

)

(22,479

)

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment

 

33

 

144

 

Purchases of marketable securities

 

(182,213

)

(257,106

)

Proceeds from maturities of marketable securities

 

232,980

 

322,223

 

Proceeds from sales of marketable securities

 

 

9,000

 

Change in restricted cash

 

383

 

 

Net cash provided by investing activities

 

46,309

 

51,782

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuances of common stock and awards, net of issuance costs

 

3,512

 

3,635

 

Purchase and retirement of common stock

 

(8,536

)

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

(5,024

)

3,635

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

214

 

(624

)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

19,726

 

(3,489

)

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

 

121,207

 

122,043

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

 

$

140,933

 

$

118,554

 

Supplemental cash flow disclosures:

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in accounts payable and accrued liabilities related to property and equipment purchases

 

$

(192

)

$

1,375

 

Income taxes paid (refunded), net

 

$

1,258

 

$

(25,023

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

5



Table of Contents

 

FORMFACTOR, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1 — Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of presentation. The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of FormFactor, Inc. and our subsidiaries have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and pursuant to the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Our interim financial statements do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles for annual financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) considered necessary to fairly present our financial position, results of operations and cash flows have been included. Operating results for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2011, or for any other period. The balance sheet at December 25, 2010 has been derived from the audited consolidated financial statements at that date but does not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. The condensed consolidated financial statements include our accounts as well as those of our wholly-owned subsidiaries after elimination of all significant inter-company balances and transactions.

 

The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in our condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates, and material effects on our consolidated operating results and financial position may result.

 

These financial statements and notes should be read with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 25, 2010 included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on February 17, 2011.

 

Fiscal year.  We operate on a 52/53 week fiscal year, whereby the fiscal year ends on the last Saturday of December. Fiscal 2011 will end on December 31, 2011, and will consist of 53 weeks.

 

Reclassifications.  Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior period’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet and Statement of Cash Flows to conform to the current period presentation.

 

Significant Accounting Policies.  Other than the accounting policies discussed in Note 2 — Recent Accounting Pronouncements and Other Reporting Considerations, our significant accounting policies have not materially changed during the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 from those disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 25, 2010.

 

Note 2 —Recent Accounting Pronouncements and Other Reporting Considerations

 

Fair Value

 

Effective December 26, 2010, as required, we adopted the guidance to amend the disclosure requirements related to recurring and nonrecurring fair value measurements.  Specifically, we have adopted the guidance requiring the disclosure of the roll forward of activities on purchases, sales, issuances and settlements of the assets and liabilities measured using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3 fair value measurements). Other than requiring additional disclosures, adoption of this new guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2011 did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Additionally, in May 2011 updated authoritative guidance to amend existing requirements for fair value measurements and disclosures was issued. The guidance expands the disclosure requirements around fair value measurements categorized in Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy and requires disclosure of the level in the fair value hierarchy of items that are not measured at fair value but whose fair value must be disclosed. It also clarifies and expands upon existing requirements for fair value measurements of financial assets and liabilities as well as instruments classified in shareholders’ equity. The guidance will be effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011, and are to be applied prospectively. This new guidance impacts how we report on fair value measurements only, and will have no effect on our results of operations, financial position or liquidity upon its required adoption by us on January 1, 2012.

 

6



Table of Contents

 

Revenue Recognition

 

In October 2009, additional authoritative guidance that modifies accounting for revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables was issued. The guidance eliminates the residual method of revenue recognition and establishes a hierarchy for determining the selling price of a deliverable in a sale arrangement whereby the selling price for each deliverable is based on vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) if available, third-party evidence (“TPE”) if VSOE is not available, or estimated selling price if neither VSOE or TPE is available.  As required, we adopted this guidance effective December 26, 2010 on a prospective basis for revenue arrangements entered into or materially modified after the adoption date. The adoption of the additional authoritative guidance modifying revenue recognition accounting standards did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011, nor is it expected to have a material impact on total net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2011 based on current business practices.

 

Comprehensive Income

 

In June 2011 authoritative guidance that addresses the presentation of comprehensive income in interim and annual reporting of financial statements was issued. The guidance is intended to improve the comparability, consistency, and transparency of financial reporting and to increase the prominence of items reported in other comprehensive income by eliminating the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders’ equity. Such changes in stockholders’ equity will be required to be disclosed in either a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. The guidance will be effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011, and should be applied retrospectively for all periods presented. Early adoption is permitted. This new guidance impacts how we report comprehensive income only, and will have no effect on our results of operations, financial position or liquidity upon its required adoption by us on January 1, 2012.

 

Note 3 — Concentration of Credit and Other Risks

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject us to concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of cash equivalents, investments and trade receivables. Our cash equivalents and marketable securities are held in safekeeping by large, creditworthy financial institutions. We either hold our excess cash on deposit with U.S. banks or invest our excess cash in government and agency bonds, money market funds and corporate obligations. We have established guidelines relative to credit ratings, diversification and maturities that seek to maintain safety and liquidity.

 

We sell our products to large multinational semiconductor manufacturers primarily located in Asia and North America. Three customers represented 25%, 22%, and 14% of total revenues during the three months ended September 24, 2011, and three customers represented 22%, 17%, and 11% of total revenues during the three months ended September 25, 2010.  Three customers represented 18%, 16% and 12% of total revenues during the nine months ended September 24, 2011, and three customers represented 22%, 14% and 13% of total revenues during the nine months ended September 25, 2010. No other customer accounted for more than 10% of total revenues in any of these fiscal periods.

 

We have significant accounts receivables concentrated with a few customers in the semiconductor industry. While our allowance for doubtful accounts balance is based on historical loss experience along with anticipated economic trends, unanticipated financial instability in the semiconductor industry could lead to higher than anticipated losses. As of September 24, 2011, three customers accounted for approximately 31%, 12% and 10% of gross accounts receivable.  At December 25, 2010, three customers accounted for approximately 21%, 19% and 11% of gross accounts receivable.  No other customer accounted for more than 10% of gross accounts receivable at either of these dates.

 

Note 4 — Restructuring Charges

 

Restructuring charges include costs related to employee termination benefits, cost of long-lived assets abandoned or impaired, as well as contract termination costs.  Restructuring charges are reflected separately as ‘Restructuring charges, net’ in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

 

2010 Restructuring Activities

 

We recorded $29,000 and $3.6 million in restructuring charges in the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010, respectively, as part of our then-current regionalization strategy (the “Q1 2010 Restructuring Plan”).  These charges consisted of termination benefits related to reductions in work force of 106 full-time positions, which were all related to severance and related benefits.

 

7


 


Table of Contents

 

In the second quarter of fiscal 2010, we announced a series of corporate initiatives, including a reduction in workforce, which represented a renewed focus on streamlining and simplifying our operations as well as reducing our quarterly operating costs (the “Q2 2010 Restructuring Plan”). These actions included a reduction in workforce impacting 67 employees spread across all functions of the organization, as well as a reduction in the scope of the previously contemplated manufacturing operations in Korea, resulting in a reduction of workforce of 16 employees related to the assembly and test function.  In conjunction with this action, we also undertook a plan to rescind the previously issued severance arrangements for certain employees impacted by the Q1 2010 Restructuring Plan. As a result of this rescission plan, as of September 25, 2010, we had reversed the existing accrual of $3.3 million for certain of the severance costs booked in conjunction with the Q1 2010 Restructuring Plan, including the accrued retention bonus to date.

 

We recorded $4.9 million and $0.2 million in charges for the Q2 2010 Restructuring Plan in the second and third quarter of fiscal 2010, respectively, primarily for severance and related benefits. Additionally, in conjunction with the Q2 2010 Restructuring Plan we identified certain equipment and software assets related to our assembly and test operations in Korea that would no longer be utilized.  As a result, we recorded impairment charges of approximately $0.9 million and $85,000 in the second and third quarter of fiscal 2010, respectively, representing the net book value of these assets.

 

In the third quarter of fiscal 2010, we announced a restructuring plan (the “Q3 2010 Restructuring Plan”) to cease the transition of manufacturing operations to Singapore. This decision resulted in a reduction in force of 58 employees at our Singapore facility. The manufacturing activities that were scheduled to be transitioned to Singapore remained in Livermore, and Livermore continued as the primary manufacturing operating location for the Company. In conjunction with the Q3 2010 Restructuring Plan, we also undertook a reduction in force that involved two additional individuals in our Livermore operations.

 

In conjunction with the Q3 2010 Restructuring Plan, we recorded charges of $1.0 million for severance and related benefits and impairment charges of $7.6 million for certain equipment and leasehold improvements in Singapore that would no longer be utilized. In addition, due to the combined effect of the significant change in our business strategy in connection with the Q3 2010 Restructuring Plan, recurring operating losses and the sustained decline in the Company’s stock price, we reviewed the recoverability of our long-lived assets in the third quarter of fiscal 2010, as discussed in Note 10.

 

The activities comprising the above reductions in force were substantially completed by the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2011.

 

In addition to the above, we executed certain additional restructuring actions during the remainder of fiscal 2010.  The ending restructuring accrual of $1.8 million as of December 25, 2010 reflects the unpaid amounts related to these actions as of that date.

 

2011 Restructuring Activities

 

In the first quarter of fiscal 2011, we implemented a restructuring plan (the “Q1 2011 Restructuring Plan”) which resulted in the reduction of our global workforce by 13 full-time employees across the organization. We recorded $1.1 million in charges for severance and related benefits during the quarter related to this plan. The activities comprising this reduction in workforce were substantially completed by the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2011.

 

In the second quarter of fiscal 2011, we implemented a restructuring plan (the “Q2 2011 Restructuring Plan”) which resulted in the reduction of our global workforce by 13 full-time employees across the organization. We recorded $0.6 million in charges for severance and related benefits during the quarter related to this plan. The activities comprising this reduction in workforce were substantially completed by the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2011.

 

Additionally, in the second quarter of fiscal 2011 we executed an amendment to the existing lease arrangement for our facility in Singapore which released us from our obligations related to the floor previously utilized for manufacturing in this facility.  We were also granted a rent reduction for the remaining occupied facilities in this building.  We had previously recorded certain asset retirement obligations and accruals related to our ceasing use of these facilities in connection with a prior restructuring action.  As a result, our Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 includes a benefit of $1.5 million recorded to ‘Restructuring charges, net’.

 

In the third quarter of fiscal 2011, we implemented a restructuring plan (the “Q3 2011 Restructuring Plan”) which resulted in the reduction of our global workforce by four full-time employees primarily in our procurement and logistics organizations. We recorded $0.3 million in charges for severance and related benefits during the quarter related to this plan. The activities comprising this reduction in workforce are expected to be completed by the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011.

 

The liabilities we have accrued represent our best estimate of the obligations we expect to incur and could be subject to adjustment as market conditions change. The remaining cash payments associated with our various reductions in workforce are expected to be paid by the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011.  As such, the restructuring accrual is recorded as a current liability within ‘Accrued liabilities’ in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

 

8



Table of Contents

 

The activities in the restructuring accrual for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Employee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Severance

 

Contract

 

 

 

 

 

and

 

Termination

 

 

 

 

 

Benefits

 

and Other

 

Total

 

Accrual at December 25, 2010

 

$

1,382

 

$

451

 

$

1,833

 

Q1 2011 Restructuring Plan charges

 

1,082

 

 

1,082

 

Cash payments

 

(1,633

)

(53

)

(1,686

)

Other adjustments

 

(40

)

 

(40

)

Accrual at March 26, 2011

 

791

 

398

 

1,189

 

Q2 2011 Restructuring Plan charges

 

627

 

 

627

 

Singapore facility restructuring adjustments

 

 

(374

)

(374

)

Cash payments

 

(728

)

(24

)

(752

)

Other adjustments

 

(345

)

 

(345

)

Accrual at June 25, 2011

 

345

 

 

345

 

Q3 2011 Restructuring Plan charges

 

265

 

 

265

 

Cash payments

 

(265

)

 

(265

)

Other adjustments

 

(63

)

 

(63

)

Accrual at September 24, 2011

 

$

282

 

$

 

$

282

 

 

Note 5 — Fair Value

 

We use fair value measurements to record fair value adjustments to certain financial and non-financial assets and to determine fair value disclosures. Our marketable securities are financial assets recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. We also have certain manufacturing equipment held for sale which is measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis and included within ‘Prepaid expenses and other current assets’ in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

 

The accounting standard for fair value defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and requires disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received from selling an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. When determining the fair value measurements for assets and liabilities required to be recorded at fair value, we consider the principal or most advantageous market in which we would transact and consider assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, such as inherent risk, transfer restrictions and risk of nonperformance. The accounting standard establishes a fair value hierarchy that requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. A financial instrument’s categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The standard describes a fair value hierarchy based on three levels of inputs, the first two of which are considered observable and the last unobservable, that may be used to measure fair value. We apply the following fair value hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:

 

·                  Level 1 - Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

·                  Level 2 - Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, which are observable either directly or indirectly.

 

·                  Level 3 - Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

 

Assets Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis

 

We measure and report certain assets and liabilities at fair value on a recurring basis, including money market funds, U.S. treasury securities, agency securities and foreign currency derivatives (see Note 17—Derivative Financial Instruments of the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for discussion of fair value of foreign currency derivatives). The following tables represent the fair value hierarchy for our other financial assets (cash equivalents and marketable securities):

 

Fair value measured on a recurring basis as of September 24, 2011 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Total

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

108,417

 

$

 

$

108,417

 

U. S. Treasury

 

 

5,000

 

5,000

 

Commercial paper

 

 

7,000

 

7,000

 

Marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. Treasury

 

 

76,760

 

76,760

 

Agency securities

 

 

89,841

 

89,841

 

Commercial paper

 

 

8,498

 

8,498

 

Total

 

$

108,417

 

$

187,099

 

$

295,516

 

 

9



Table of Contents

 

Fair value measured on a recurring basis as of December 25, 2010 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Total

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

82,996

 

$

 

$

82,996

 

Commercial paper

 

 

16,991

 

16,991

 

Marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. Treasury

 

 

105,865

 

105,865

 

Agency securities

 

 

108,173

 

108,173

 

Commercial paper

 

 

11,990

 

11,990

 

Total

 

$

82,996

 

$

243,019

 

$

326,015

 

 

The Level 1 assets consist of our money market fund deposits. The Level 2 assets consist of our available-for-sale investment portfolio, which are valued utilizing a market approach. Our investments are priced by pricing vendors who provided observable inputs for their pricing without applying significant judgments. Broker’s pricing is used mainly when a quoted price is not available, the investment is not priced by our pricing vendors or when a broker price is more reflective of fair values in the market in which the investment trades. Our broker-priced investments are labeled as Level 2 investments because fair values of these investments are based on similar assets without applying significant judgments. In addition, all of our investments have a sufficient level of trading volume to demonstrate that the fair values used are appropriate for these investments.

 

We did not have any significant transfers of assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis to or from Level 1 and Level 2 during the periods ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010.

 

Assets Measured at Fair Value on a Nonrecurring Basis

 

All of our long-lived assets measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis were classified as Level 3 assets within the fair value hierarchy.  We did not recognize any realized gains or losses on such assets during the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011, respectively.

 

At the end of fiscal 2010, we had a building held for sale in Livermore, California, which was classified as Level 2 because the estimated fair value of the building was determined using inputs that reflected the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the building developed based on market data obtained from sources independent of us.  During the quarter ended March 26, 2011 we placed this building back into service at its carrying value of $0.8 million, resulting in a reclassification of the balance from ‘Prepaid expenses and other current assets’ to ‘Property, plant and equipment, net’ in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.   See Note 10 — Long-lived Assets of the Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for more information.

 

At the end of fiscal 2010, we also had certain manufacturing equipment held for sale in Livermore, California which was classified as Level 3 as we used unobservable inputs in their valuation reflecting our assumptions that market participants would use in pricing this asset due to the absence of recent comparable market transactions and inherent lack of liquidity.  As of both September 24, 2011 and December 25, 2010, our held for sale assets in Livermore were valued at $0.4 million and continued to be classified as Level 3 based on the fact that we used unobservable inputs in their valuation reflecting our assumptions that market participants would use in pricing this asset due to the absence of recent comparable market transactions.

 

Other than the building previously held for sale that was put into service during the three months ended March 26, 2011, we did not have any assets that were transferred to or from Level 3 during the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010.

 

Our fair value processes include controls that are designed to ensure appropriate fair values are recorded. Such controls include model validation, review of key model inputs, and analysis of period-over-period fluctuations and independent recalculation of prices.

 

10



Table of Contents

 

Note 6 — Marketable Securities

 

We classify our marketable debt securities as “available-for-sale”.  All marketable securities represent the investment of funds available for current operations, notwithstanding their contractual maturities. Such marketable securities are recorded at fair value and unrealized gains and losses are recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income until realized.

 

Marketable securities at September 24, 2011 consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Gross

 

Gross

 

 

 

 

 

Amortized

 

Unrealized

 

Unrealized

 

Fair

 

 

 

Cost

 

Gains

 

Losses

 

Value

 

U. S. Treasury

 

$

76,464

 

$

297

 

$

(1

)

$

76,760

 

Agency Securities

 

89,753

 

122

 

(34

)

89,841

 

Commercial Paper

 

8,498

 

 

 

8,498

 

 

 

$

174,715

 

$

419

 

$

(35

)

$

175,099

 

 

Marketable securities at December 25, 2010 consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Gross

 

Gross

 

 

 

 

 

Amortized

 

Unrealized

 

Unrealized

 

Fair

 

 

 

Cost

 

Gains

 

Losses

 

Value

 

U. S. Treasury

 

$

105,513

 

$

372

 

$

(20

)

$

105,865

 

Agency Securities

 

108,361

 

36

 

(224

)

108,173

 

Commercial Paper

 

11,988

 

2

 

 

11,990

 

 

 

$

225,862

 

$

410

 

$

(244

)

$

226,028

 

 

The marketable securities with gross unrealized losses have been in a loss position for less than 12 months as of September 24, 2011 and December 25, 2010, respectively.

 

When evaluating the investments for other-than-temporary impairment, we review factors such as the length of time and extent to which fair value has been below the amortized cost basis, review of current market liquidity, interest rate risk, the financial condition of the issuer, as well as credit rating downgrades.  We believe that the unrealized losses are not other-than-temporary. We do not have a foreseeable need to liquidate the portfolio and anticipate recovering the full cost of the securities either as market conditions improve, or as the securities mature.

 

Contractual maturities of marketable securities as of September 24, 2011 were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair
Value

 

Due in one year or less

 

$

71,793

 

$

71,923

 

Due after one year to three years

 

102,922

 

103,176

 

 

 

$

174,715

 

$

175,099

 

 

Realized gains and losses on sales and maturities of marketable securities were immaterial for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010, respectively.

 

11


 


Table of Contents

 

Note 7 — Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

We recorded a reduction in provision for doubtful accounts of $0.6 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2011 primarily due to the receipt of payments totaling $0.3 million for accounts receivable previously reserved and the write-off of previously reserved accounts receivable in the amount of $0.3 million. We did not record any significant new allowances in the second or third quarters of fiscal 2011, nor did we release any previously reserved bad debts.  A reconciliation of the changes in our allowance for doubtful accounts receivable consisted of the following activity for our quarterly fiscal periods ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010, respectively (in thousands):

 

 

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
Receivable Activity
for fiscal quarters ended:

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Beginning balance

 

$

847

 

$

9,260

 

Additions

 

 

 

Deductions

 

(610

)

(147

)

First fiscal quarter ending balance

 

237

 

9,113

 

Additions

 

28

 

315

 

Deductions

 

 

(496

)

Second fiscal quarter ending balance

 

265

 

8,932

 

Additions

 

 

 

Deductions

 

 

(7,732

)

Third fiscal quarter ending balance

 

$

265

 

$

1,200

 

 

Note 8 — Inventories

 

Inventories consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

September 24,

 

December 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Raw materials

 

$

6,557

 

$

2,736

 

Work-in-progress

 

8,366

 

16,807

 

Finished goods

 

5,724

 

5,460

 

 

 

$

20,647

 

$

25,003

 

 

We record provisions for excess and obsolete inventory based on forecasts of future demand. While management believes the estimates and assumptions underlying its current forecasts are reasonable, there is risk that additional charges may be necessary if current forecasts are greater than actual demand.

 

Note 9 — Warranty

 

We offer warranties on certain products and record a liability for the estimated future costs associated with warranty claims, which is based upon historical experience and our estimate of the level of future costs. Warranty costs are reflected in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations as a cost of revenues.  A reconciliation of the changes in our warranty accrual liability (included in ‘Accrued liabilities’ in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets) consisted of the following activity for our quarterly fiscal periods ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010, respectively (in thousands):

 

 

 

Warranty Accrual Activity
for fiscal quarters ended:

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Beginning balance

 

$

433

 

$

732

 

Accrual (release) of warranties during the period

 

(180

)

(396

)

Settlements made during the period

 

(64

)

(29

)

First fiscal quarter ending balance

 

189

 

307

 

Accrual (release) of warranties during the period

 

322

 

254

 

Settlements made during the period

 

(193

)

(154

)

Second fiscal quarter ending balance

 

318

 

407

 

Accrual (release) of warranties during the period

 

612

 

325

 

Settlements made during the period

 

(170

)

(327

)

Third fiscal quarter ending balance

 

$

760

 

$

405

 

 

12



Table of Contents

 

Note 10 — Long-lived Assets

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

During the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010, we recorded impairments in the carrying amount of our long-lived assets and assets held for sale. The following table summarizes the components of the impairments (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

Impairment of long-lived assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restructuring

 

$

 

$

7,672

 

$

 

$

8,530

 

Assets held for sale

 

 

342

 

 

342

 

Assets to be disposed of other than sale

 

100

 

1,957

 

451

 

2,956

 

Intangible assets

 

 

1,082

 

 

1,082

 

Enterprise-wide impairment

 

 

52,021

 

 

52,021

 

Total

 

$

100

 

$

63,074

 

$

451

 

$

64,931

 

 

Restructuring

 

In conjunction with the Q2 2010 Restructuring Plan we recorded an impairment charge of approximately $1.0 million in fiscal 2010 to write off certain equipment and software assets related to our assembly and test operations in Korea that would no longer be utilized. In addition, in conjunction with the Q3 2010 Restructuring Plan, we recorded an impairment charge of $7.6 million for certain assets related to our Singapore manufacturing operations. This impairment was composed primarily of $5.8 million for leasehold improvements, $0.6 million for manufacturing equipment and $0.6 million for software and system assets related to the manufacturing operations that will be taken out of service or abandoned, as well as $0.6 million to adjust the carrying amount of certain equipment determined to be held for sale.  All of these charges were included within ‘Restructuring charges, net’ in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010.

 

We have not recorded any impairment charges related to our restructuring activity during fiscal 2011 to date.

 

Assets held for sale

 

In the third quarter of fiscal 2010, we recorded aggregated impairment charges of $0.3 million in conjunction with the write down of a building held for sale to its estimated fair value and certain furniture and fixtures at our Livermore facility that was determined to be held for sale.  These impairments were included within ‘Impairment of long-lived assets’ in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010.

 

We have not recorded any impairment charges related to our assets held for sale during fiscal 2011 to date.

 

Assets to be disposed of other than sale

 

In the second quarter of fiscal 2010, we recorded an impairment charge of $1.0 million related to the termination of an on-going construction-in-progress project. In the third quarter of fiscal 2010, we recorded an impairment charge of $2.0 million for certain assets to be disposed of other than sale. This charge was composed of an impairment of $0.3 million related to certain leasehold improvements that will be abandoned as a result of the consolidation of office space in Livermore and an impairment of $1.7 million related to certain construction-in-progress projects for the development and build of manufacturing equipment as well as additional related equipment that was in-service and was identified as excess capacity. These projects were terminated during the quarter ended September 25, 2010 and as a result these assets were fully impaired.

 

13



Table of Contents

 

During the three months ended March 26, 2011 we recorded an impairment of $0.4 million related to the termination of aspects of an on-going project related to certain software development for internal use that had been recorded in construction-in-progress.  Additionally, during the three months ended September 24, 2011, we recorded an impairment of $0.1 million related to the termination of additional on-going projects that had been recorded in construction-in-progress.

 

All of these charges are included in ‘Impairment of long-lived assets’ in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations in their respective periods.

 

Intangible assets

 

During the third quarter of fiscal 2010, the combination of various factors, including our renewed focus on simplifying and refocusing our operations on our core competencies, resulted in our decision to reduce efforts geared at licensing and marketing the software underlying certain of our intangible assets related to precision motion control automation that were acquired in conjunction with our acquisition of certain assets in 2009 through a bankruptcy proceeding.  As a result, we performed an impairment analysis of these purchased intangible assets during the third quarter of fiscal 2010.  Based on the results of the analysis, we recorded an impairment charge of $1.1 million for the carrying amount of the impaired assets in the quarter ended September 25, 2010, which was included in ‘Impairment of long-lived assets’ in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

 

We have not recorded any impairment charges related to our intangible assets during fiscal 2011 to date.

 

Enterprise-wide impairment

 

At the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2010, in addition to the specific impairments discussed above, we determined that an enterprise-wide impairment analysis of our long-lived assets was required due to the combined effect of a sustained decline in the Company’s stock price, a significant change in our business strategy in connection with the Q3 2010 Restructuring Plan, and recurring operating losses and net cash outflows from operations. Accordingly, management reviewed the recoverability of its long-lived assets in the third quarter of fiscal 2010.

 

We determined our long-lived asset group to be our consolidated long-lived assets as we had determined that we operated as one reporting unit and segment.  This asset group included property and equipment, as well as purchased intangible assets.  The recoverability of assets to be held and used was measured by comparing the carrying amount of these assets, after adjustment for the various specific impairments discussed above, to the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the assets. If the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its estimated undiscounted future net cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset.

 

As a result of this analysis, we concluded that our business was not able to fully recover the carrying amount of our assets.  Accordingly, we reviewed the carrying amounts at September 25, 2010 of all of our long-lived assets for impairment. The review involved estimating the fair value in an exchange transaction of our asset group, comparing such fair value to the carrying amount of the asset group, after adjustment for the various specific impairments discussed above, and recording impairment charges to reduce the pre-impairment carrying amount of the asset group to its estimated fair value.  Based on this analysis, an impairment charge of approximately $52.0 million was recorded as of September 25, 2010.  This charge, which was included in ‘Impairment of long-lived assets’ in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations, was composed of $27.7 million for leasehold improvements, $11.2 million for manufacturing equipment, $8.5 million for computer equipment, $4.4 million for construction-in-progress and $0.2 million for purchased intangible assets.

 

We have not recorded any impairment charges related to an enterprise-wide impairment during fiscal 2011 to date.

 

Long-lived Assets

 

Property, plant and equipment consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

September 24,

 

December 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Building

 

$

790

 

$

 

Machinery and equipment

 

123,773

 

115,847

 

Computer equipment and software

 

36,294

 

35,493

 

Furniture and fixtures

 

6,082

 

6,180

 

Leasehold improvements

 

70,472

 

69,934

 

 

 

237,411

 

227,454

 

Less: Accumulated depreciation, amortization and enterprise-wide impairment

 

(216,343

)

(207,992

)

 

 

21,068

 

19,462

 

Construction-in-progress

 

13,804

 

17,849

 

 

 

$

34,872

 

$

37,311

 

 

14



Table of Contents

 

During the quarter ended March 26, 2011 we placed a building previously identified as held for sale back into service at its carrying value of $0.8 million.  This amount represents the lesser of its carrying amount before the building was classified as held for sale, adjusted for any depreciation that would have been recognized had the building been continuously classified as held and used, or the fair value at the date of the subsequent decision not to sell. The building is being depreciated over its estimated remaining useful life of ten years.

 

At September 24, 2011, the carrying amount of our intangible asset, which consists of purchased intellectual property, was $3.5 million, with $5.9 million as the gross amount and $2.4 million as the accumulated amortization. We recorded $0.3 million and $0.9 million of amortization expense for our intangible asset during the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011, respectively, all of which was charged to cost of revenues.  The intangible asset had a remaining amortization period of 3.0 years at September 24, 2011. The intangible asset is included in ‘Other assets’ in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

 

Note 11 — Comprehensive Loss

 

Comprehensive loss includes foreign currency translation adjustments and unrealized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities, the impact of which has been excluded from net income and reflected as components of stockholders’ equity.

 

Components of comprehensive loss were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

Net loss

 

$

(9,904

)

$

(95,827

)

$

(39,006

)

$

(167,875

)

Unrealized gain on investments, net

 

(82

)

(171

)

127

 

179

 

Cumulative translation adjustments

 

255

 

758

 

829

 

729

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(9,731

)

$

(95,240

)

$

(38,050

)

$

(166,967

)

 

Components of accumulated other comprehensive income was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

September 24,

 

December 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Unrealized gain (loss) on marketable securities, net of tax of $393 at September 24, 2011 and $299 at December 25, 2010, respectively

 

$

(9

)

$

(136

)

Cumulative translation adjustments

 

2,992

 

2,163

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

$

2,983

 

$

2,027

 

 

Note 12 — Stockholders’ Equity

 

Common Stock Repurchase Program

 

On October 20, 2010, our Board of Directors authorized a program to repurchase up to $50.0 million of outstanding common stock.  Under the authorized stock repurchase program, we may repurchase shares from time to time on the open market; the pace of repurchase activity will depend on levels of cash generation, current stock price, and other factors. The stock repurchase program was announced on October 26, 2010 and had a scheduled expiration of October 19, 2011. The program may be modified or discontinued at any time.  During fiscal year 2010 we repurchased and retired 70,000 shares of common stock for $0.6 million under this repurchase authorization.  During the first fiscal quarter of 2011 we repurchased and retired 262,712 shares for $2.3 million, during the second fiscal quarter of 2011 we repurchased and retired 117,437 shares for $1.0 million, and during the third fiscal quarter of 2011 we repurchased and retired an additional 695,134 shares for $5.5 million.

 

On October 12, 2011, our Board of Directors authorized the extension of this repurchase program through October 19, 2012.  Under the existing program, we may repurchase up to $40.5 million of outstanding common stock during the program period.  The terms and conditions of the extended repurchase program remain the same as those in the original program approved in fiscal 2010.

 

15


 


Table of Contents

 

Repurchased shares are retired upon the settlement of the related trade transactions. Our policy related to repurchases of our common stock is to charge the excess of cost over par value to additional paid-in capital. All repurchases were made in compliance with Rule 10b-18 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

 

Equity Incentive Plans

 

We have four equity incentive plans for which we have reserved shares for issuance upon the exercise of stock options: the 1996 Stock Option Plan, the Incentive Option Plan and the Management Incentive Option Plan (together, the “Prior Plans”), and the 2002 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2002 Plan”), which became effective in April 2002. Upon the effectiveness of the 2002 Plan, we ceased granting any equity awards under the Prior Plans, although forfeited, repurchased, cancelled or terminated Prior Plan shares are transferred to the 2002 Plan.

 

Stock Options

 

Stock option activity under the Prior Plans and the 2002 Plan during the nine months ended September 24, 2011 is set forth below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

Remaining

 

Aggregate

 

 

 

Options

 

Average

 

Contractual

 

Intrinsic

 

 

 

Outstanding

 

Exercise Price

 

Life in Years

 

Value

 

Balances, December 25, 2010

 

5,318,387

 

$

14.53

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted

 

202,250

 

8.94

 

 

 

 

 

Options exercised

 

(12,515

)

6.23

 

 

 

 

 

Options cancelled:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

(70,275

)

9.86

 

 

 

 

 

Expired

 

(105,289

)

29.18

 

 

 

 

 

Balances, March 26, 2011

 

5,332,558

 

14.11

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted

 

257,500

 

10.33

 

 

 

 

 

Options exercised

 

(7,485

)

6.50

 

 

 

 

 

Options cancelled:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

(74,993

)

9.34

 

 

 

 

 

Expired

 

(274,166

)

21.67

 

 

 

 

 

Balances, June 25, 2011

 

5,233,414

 

13.61

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options exercised

 

(121,280

)

6.50

 

 

 

 

 

Options cancelled:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

(99,655

)

10.00

 

 

 

 

 

Expired

 

(140,470

)

28.16

 

 

 

 

 

Balances, September 24, 2011

 

4,872,009

 

$

13.44

 

4.62

 

$

14,085

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vested and expected to vest at September 24, 2011

 

4,544,470

 

$

13.69

 

4.53

 

$

14,085

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercisable at September 24, 2011

 

1,652,151

 

$

20.45

 

2.56

 

$

14,085

 

 

The intrinsic value of option exercises was $0.2 million during the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011. Cash received from stock option exercises during the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 was $0.8 million and $0.9 million, respectively. We did not realize any gross tax benefits in connection with these exercises.

 

16



Table of Contents

 

Restricted Stock Units

 

Restricted stock unit activity under the 2002 Plan during the nine months ended September 24, 2011 is set forth below:

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

 

 

 

 

Average
Grant Date

 

 

 

Units

 

Fair Value

 

Non-vested restricted stock units at December 25, 2010

 

1,372,912

 

$

16.29

 

Awards granted

 

51,600

 

8.89

 

Awards released

 

(103,525

)

17.92

 

Awards cancelled

 

(112,118

)

17.08

 

Non-vested restricted stock units at March 26, 2011

 

1,208,869

 

15.77

 

Awards granted

 

585,655

 

10.28

 

Awards released

 

(313,741

)

16.50

 

Awards cancelled

 

(54,654

)

15.40

 

Non-vested restricted stock units at June 25, 2011

 

1,426,129

 

13.37

 

Awards granted

 

22,940

 

8.59

 

Awards released

 

(27,300

)

10.96

 

Awards cancelled

 

(40,842

)

14.91

 

Non-vested restricted stock units at September 24, 2011

 

1,380,927

 

$

13.29

 

 

Note 13 — Stock-Based Compensation

 

We account for all stock-based compensation to employees and directors, including grants of stock options, as stock-based compensation costs in the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements based on the fair value measured as of the date of grant. These costs are recognized as an expense in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations over the requisite service period and increase additional paid-in capital.  The table below shows the stock-based compensation charges included in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

Stock-based compensation expense included in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of revenues

 

$

694

 

$

882

 

$

2,297

 

$

2,847

 

Research and development

 

887

 

1,038

 

3,099

 

4,394

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

1,758

 

2,299

 

4,265

 

6,130

 

Restructuring

 

 

16

 

 

192

 

Total stock-based compensation

 

$

3,339

 

$

4,235

 

$

9,661

 

$

13,563

 

 

Stock Options

 

We did not grant any stock options during the three months ended September 24, 2011.  During the nine months ended September 24, 2011, we granted 459,750 stock options under the 2002 Plan with a weighted average grant-date fair value of $4.06 per share. During the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010, 450,000 and 870,570 stock options were granted under the 2002 Plan with weighted average grant-date fair values of $3.27 and $4.77 per share, respectively.  The following weighted-average assumptions were used in the estimated grant-date fair value calculations for stock options:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

Stock Options:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividend yield

 

%

%

%

%

Expected volatility

 

%

51.1

%

50.3

%

50.4

%

Risk-free interest rate

 

%

1.38

%

1.67

%

1.63

%

Expected term (in years)

 

 

4.61

 

4.26

 

4.54

 

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

During the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011, 158,081 shares and 386,818 shares, respectively, were issued under the Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”).  During the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010, 207,910 shares and

 

17



Table of Contents

 

365,871 shares, respectively were issued under the ESPP.  The following weighted-average assumptions were used in estimating the fair value of employee’s purchase rights under the ESPP:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

ESPP:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividend yield

 

%

%

%

%

Expected volatility

 

51.0

%

48.6

%

53.4

%

41.4

%

Risk-free interest rate

 

0.26

%

0.20

%

0.23

%

0.25

%

Expected term (in years)

 

1.0

 

0.5

 

0.8

 

0.5 — 1.0

 

 

Unrecognized Compensation Costs

 

At September 24, 2011, the unrecognized stock-based compensation, adjusted for estimated forfeitures, was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Average Expected

 

 

 

Unrecognized

 

Recognition Period

 

 

 

Expense

 

in years

 

Stock options

 

$

9,551

 

2.33

 

Restricted stock units

 

10,534

 

2.52

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

431

 

0.35

 

Total unrecognized stock-based compensation expense

 

$

20,516

 

 

 

 

Note 14 — Net Loss per Share

 

Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted net loss per share is computed giving effect to all potential dilutive common stock, including stock options, restricted stock units and common stock subject to repurchase. Diluted loss per share for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010, respectively, was based only on the weighted-average number of shares outstanding during that period as the inclusion of any common stock equivalents would have been anti-dilutive.

 

A reconciliation of the numerator and denominator used in the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss used in computing basic and diluted net loss per share

 

$

(9,904

)

$

(95,827

)

$

(39,006

)

$

(167,875

)

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares used in computing basic net loss per share

 

50,747

 

50,431

 

50,719

 

50,136

 

Add potentially dilutive securities

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares used in computing diluted net loss per share

 

50,747

 

50,431

 

50,719

 

50,136

 

 

The following table sets forth the weighted-average of all potentially dilutive securities excluded from the computation in the table above because their effect would have been anti-dilutive (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

Options to purchase common stock

 

4,799

 

5,255

 

4,770

 

5,445

 

Restricted stock units

 

1,267

 

1,527

 

1,123

 

578

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

22

 

 

43

 

63

 

Total potentially dilutive securities

 

6,088

 

6,782

 

5,936

 

6,086

 

 

18



Table of Contents

 

Note 15 — Income Taxes

 

We recorded an income tax provision of $0.2 million for the three months ended September 24, 2011 and an income tax benefit of $2.1 million for the nine months ended September 24, 2011, as compared to an income tax provision of $0.2 million and $0.7 million for the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010, respectively. The income tax provision recorded for the three months ended September 24, 2011 reflects the tax provision on our non-U.S. operations in foreign jurisdictions.  The income tax benefit recorded for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 primarily relates to a $2.5 million release of the deferred tax valuation allowance for a non-U.S. jurisdiction, offset by income tax expense in certain of our non-U.S. operations in foreign jurisdictions.  The income tax provision for the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010 reflects the tax provision on our non-U.S. operations in foreign jurisdictions.  We continue to maintain a valuation allowance for our U.S. Federal and state deferred tax assets.

 

During the second fiscal quarter ended June 25, 2011, we determined that it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets of a non-U.S. jurisdiction will be realized after considering all positive and negative evidence. Positive evidence included finalization of our current restructuring activity for the related foreign jurisdiction and conclusion that such location will continue to be in operation for the foreseeable future, as well as a forecast of future taxable income sufficient to realize such deferred tax assets prior to the expiration of existing net operating loss carryforwards due to a change in the entity’s structure to a cost-plus arrangement. Accordingly, a deferred tax valuation allowance release of $2.5 million was recorded as an income tax benefit during the quarter. Our conclusion that it is more likely than not that such deferred tax assets will be realized is strongly influenced by the expectation that such location will continue to be in operation for the foreseeable future. We believe such conclusion is reasonable in light of our current operational structure and forecasted operations, both for the foreign jurisdiction and our consolidated operations; however, such conclusion is inherently uncertain. Therefore, if we have material unforeseen losses or are required to restructure our non-U.S. operations to further align our operating expense structure with our expected revenues, then its ability to generate sufficient income necessary to realize a portion of the deferred tax assets may be reduced and an additional charge to increase the valuation allowance may be recorded.

 

The liability for uncertain tax positions was classified as a long-term income taxes liability as payments are not anticipated over the next 12 months.  It may be reduced when liabilities are settled with taxing authorities or when the statute of limitations expires without assessment from tax authorities. We are unable to make a reasonable estimate as to when cash settlements with the relevant taxing authorities will occur.  Unrecognized tax benefits increased by $1.0 million to $18.5 million during the nine months ended September 24, 2011 primarily as a result of additional R&D credit reserves and foreign transfer pricing reserves.  If recognized, $14.5 million of these unrecognized tax benefits (net of U.S. Federal benefit) would be recorded as a reduction of future income tax provision before consideration of changes in valuation allowance.

 

We classify interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions as part of the income tax provision.  For the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011, we recognized interest charges and penalties of approximately $3,000 and $26,000, respectively.  For the three and nine months ended September 25, 2010, we recognized interest charges and penalties of approximately $48,000 and $0.2 million, respectively.  As of September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010, we have accrued total interest and penalties of $0.5 million and $0.9 million, respectively, related to unrecognized tax benefits.

 

The amount of income taxes we pay is subject to ongoing audits by Federal, state and non-U.S. tax authorities which might result in proposed assessments.  Our estimate for the potential outcome for any uncertain tax issue is judgmental in nature. A number of years may elapse before an uncertain tax position is audited and finally resolved. While it is often difficult to predict the final outcome or the timing of resolution of any particular uncertain tax position, we believe that our reserves for income taxes reflect the most likely outcome. We adjust these reserves, as well as the related interest, in light of changing facts and circumstances.   However, if an ultimate tax assessment exceeds our estimate of tax liabilities, additional tax expense will be recorded. The impact of such adjustments could have a material impact on our results of operations in future periods.

 

Note 16 — Commitments and Contingencies

 

Environmental Matters

 

We are subject to U.S. Federal, state and local, and foreign governmental laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment, including those governing the discharge of pollutants into the air and water, the management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes, the clean-up of contaminated sites and the maintenance of a safe workplace. We believe that we comply in all material respects with the environmental laws and regulations that apply to us, including those of the California Department of Toxic Substances Control, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the City of Livermore Water Resources Division and the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health. We did not receive any notices of violations of environmental laws and regulations in fiscal 2010 or during the first nine months of our fiscal 2011. No provision has been made for loss from environmental remediation liabilities associated with our facilities because we believe that it is not probable that a liability has been incurred as of September 24, 2011.

 

19



Table of Contents

 

While we believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with the environmental laws and regulations that apply to us, in the future, we may receive additional environmental violation notices, and if received, final resolution of the violations identified by these notices could harm our operations, which may adversely impact our operating results and cash flows. New laws and regulations, stricter enforcement of existing laws and regulations, the discovery of previously unknown contamination at our or others’ sites or the imposition of new cleanup requirements could also harm our operations, thereby adversely impacting our operating results and cash flows.

 

Indemnification Arrangements

 

We may, from time to time in the ordinary course of our business, enter into contractual arrangements with third parties that include indemnification obligations. Under these contractual arrangements, we have agreed to defend, indemnify and/or hold the third party harmless from and against certain liabilities. These arrangements include indemnities in favor of customers in the event that our wafer probe cards infringe a third party’s intellectual property and in favor of our lessors in connection with facility leasehold liabilities that we may cause. In addition, we have entered into indemnification agreements with our directors and certain of our officers, and our bylaws contain indemnification obligations in favor of our directors, officers and agents. These indemnity arrangements may limit the type of the claim, the total amount that we can be required to pay in connection with the indemnification obligation and the time within which an indemnification claim can be made. The duration of the indemnification obligation may vary, and for most arrangements survives the agreement term and is indefinite. We believe that substantially all of our indemnity arrangements provide either for limitations on the maximum amount of potential future payments we could be obligated to make, or limitations on the types of claims and damages we could be obligated to indemnify, or both. However, it is not possible to determine or reasonably estimate the maximum potential amount of future payments under these indemnification obligations due to the varying terms of such obligations, the history of prior indemnification claims, the unique facts and circumstances involved in each particular contractual arrangement and in each potential future claim for indemnification, and the contingency of any potential liabilities upon the occurrence of events that are not reasonably determinable. We have not had any requests for indemnification under these arrangements to date. Our management believes that any liability for these indemnity arrangements would not be material to our accompanying consolidated financial statements. We have not recorded any liabilities for these indemnification arrangements on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet as of September 24, 2011.

 

Legal Matters

 

From time to time, we may be subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of business. For the periods ended September 24, 2011, we were not involved in any material legal proceedings, other than the proceedings summarized below. In the future we may become a party to additional legal proceedings, including proceedings designed to protect our intellectual property rights that require us to spend significant resources. Litigation in general and intellectual property litigation in particular, can be expensive and disruptive to normal business operations. Moreover, the results of legal proceedings are difficult to predict, and the costs incurred in litigation can be substantial, regardless of outcome.

 

Customs and Trade Matters

 

From time to time we receive communications from certain jurisdictions regarding customs and indirect tax matters such as customs duties and value added taxes.  In July 2011 we received an inquiry from a foreign jurisdiction tax authority regarding certain indirect tax matters.  We are cooperating with this inquiry, which relates to our prior shipping processes for new product qualifications and for products for certain of our repair center activities.  To date, we have accrued $1.0 million for potential exposure related to this matter, but it is possible that the inquiry could result in additional material liabilities and that we could incur material expenses in responding to the inquiry.

 

Patent Litigation

 

In 2005, we filed a patent infringement lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Oregon against Phicom Corporation, a Korea corporation, and its U.S. subsidiary, both collectively “Phicom”, charging that it is willfully infringing four U.S. patents that cover key aspects of our wafer probe cards—U.S. Patent Nos. 5,974,662, 6,246,247, 6,624,648, and 5,994,152. In 2006, we also filed an amended complaint in the same Oregon district court adding two additional patents to the litigation—U.S. Patent Nos. 7,073,254 and 6,615,485.  The district court action proceeded in parallel with legal action we brought against Phicom in Korea Courts.  The district court action was stayed pending resolution of the complaint that we filed with the United States International Trade Commission, or Commission, on or about November 13, 2007, seeking institution of a formal investigation into the activities of Phicom and of Micronics Japan Co., Ltd.  An investigation was initiated and, in November 2009, in response to a request for review of prior decisions by the assigned Administrative Law Judge, the Commission issued a decision, which is termed a “final determination,” finding certain of FormFactor’s asserted patent claims valid, but not infringed, and other asserted patent claims invalid. The Commission did not find a violation of Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 and terminated the investigation without issuing an exclusionary order against any products. We did not appeal the final determination to the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The

 

20



Table of Contents

 

stay in the district court action against Phicom, now operating under the name TSC MEMSYS Co. Ltd., was lifted.  During our fiscal quarter ending September 24, 2011, we resolved amicably the district court action in Oregon, as well as any continuing infringement proceedings, through a confidential settlement agreement.

 

In July 2010, we filed a patent infringement lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California against Micro-Probe Incorporated charging that it is willfully infringing six U.S. patents that cover aspects of our proprietary technology and wafer probe cards. The complaint sought both injunctive relief and money damages for Micro-Probe’s alleged infringement of our U.S. Patent No. 6,441,315 for “Contact Structures With Blades Having A Wiping Motion,” U.S. Patent No. 6,825,422 for “Interconnection Element With Contact Blade,” U.S. Patent No. 6,965,244 for “High Performance Probe System,” U.S. Patent No. 7,227,371 for “High Performance Probe System,” U.S. Patent No. 6,246,247 for “Probe Card Assembly and Kit, and Methods of Using Same,” and U.S. Patent No. 6,624,648 for “Probe Card Assembly.” The complaint also sought injunctive relief and damages against Micro-Probe for unfair competition and further includes claims directed against a former employee for breach of confidence relative to our confidential and propriety information and against the former employee and Micro-Probe for conspiring to breach that confidence. After Micro-Probe and the former employee filed motions to dismiss, we voluntarily filed an amended complaint which was substantially similar to our original complaint except that we added a claim against the former employee alleging misappropriation of trade secrets and we omitted the infringement allegation related to our U.S. Patent No. 6,624,648, which is the subject of a re-examination proceeding before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO. Micro-Probe and the former employee have both filed answers to our amended complaint.  We have filed a second amended complaint in which we added allegations of infringement based upon two additional patents: U.S. Patent No. 7,671,614 for “Apparatus and Method for Adjusting An Orientation of Probes” and U.S. Patent No. 7,225,538 for “Resilient Contact Structures Formed And Then Attached To A Substrate”.

 

One or more third parties have initiated challenges in the U.S. and in foreign patent offices against certain of the above and other of our patents. These actions include requests for re-examination proceedings filed by Micro-Probe with the USPTO directed to our U.S. Patent Nos. 6,246,247, 6,825,422, 6,441,315, 6,965,244, 7,225,538, 7,227,371 and 7,671,614. The USPTO granted the re-examination requests directed to U.S. Patent Nos. 6,246,247, 6,825,422 and 6,441,315, and granted in part the requests directed to U.S. Patent Nos. 6,965,244, 7,227,371 and 7,671,614.  The foreign actions include proceedings in Taiwan against several of our Taiwan patents.

 

Based on the nature and status of our patent-related litigation, no provision has been made because we believe that it is not probable that a liability had been incurred as of September 24, 2011. We will incur material attorneys’ fees in prosecuting and defending the various identified actions.

 

Note 17 — Derivative Financial Instruments

 

We operate and sell our products in various global markets. As a result, we are exposed to changes in foreign currency exchange rates. We utilize foreign currency forward contracts to hedge against future movements in foreign exchange rates that affect certain existing foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities, primarily trade receivables and payables. Under this program, our strategy is to have increases or decreases in our foreign currency exposures offset by gains or losses on the foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate the risks and volatility associated with foreign currency transaction gains or losses. We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes. Our derivative instruments, which are generally settled in the same quarter, are not designated for hedge accounting treatment. We record the fair value of these contracts as of the end of our reporting period to our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet with changes in fair value recorded within “Other income (expense), net” in our Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for both realized and unrealized gains and losses.

 

As of September 24, 2011, we had the following outstanding foreign exchange forward contracts that we entered into to hedge forecasted revenues and purchases (in thousands):

 

Currency

 

Contract Position

 

Contract Amount
(Local Currency)

 

Contract Amount
(U.S. Dollars)

 

Japanese Yen

 

Sell

 

411,366

 

$

5,351

 

Korean Won

 

Buy

 

(30,512

)

(1,009

)

Taiwan Dollar

 

Buy

 

(366,071

)

(312

)

Total USD notional amount of outstanding foreign exchange contracts

 

 

 

 

 

$

4,030

 

 

The contracts were entered into on September 23, 2011 and matured on September 27, 2011. Our foreign currency contracts are classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy as they are valued using pricing models that utilize observable market inputs. There was no change in the value of these contracts as of September 24, 2011. Additionally, no gains or losses relating to the outstanding derivative contracts were recorded in the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011.

 

21


 


Table of Contents

 

The location and amount of gains and losses related to non-designated derivative instruments that matured in the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010 in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations are as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Amount of Gain or (Loss) Recognized on Derivatives

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

Derivatives Not Designated as

 

Location of Gain or (Loss)

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

Hedging Instruments

 

Recognized on Derivatives

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign exchange forward contracts

 

Other income (expense), net

 

$

(352

)

$

(1,100

)

$

(641

)

$

(1,539

)

 

Note 18 — Subsequent Events

 

In October 2011, we entered into a Separation Agreement and General Release with a former Senior Vice President. As a result, we will record a charge of $0.8 million within “Cost of revenues” in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the fiscal quarter and year ending December 31, 2011, such charge being composed of $0.5 million of payroll and related expenses and $0.3 million of stock-based compensation expense related to the modification of certain stock-based compensation awards.

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Securities Act of 1933, which are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. The forward-looking statements include statements concerning, among other things, our business strategy, including anticipated trends and developments in and management plans for our business and the markets in which we operate, financial results, operating results, revenues, gross margin, operating expenses, products, projected costs and capital expenditures, research and development programs, sales and marketing initiatives, and competition. In some cases, you can identify these statements by forward-looking words such as “may,” “might,” “could,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “intend” and “continue,” the negative or plural of these words and other comparable terminology.

 

The forward-looking statements are only predictions based on our current expectations and our projections about future events. All forward-looking statements included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are based upon information available to us as of the filing date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update any of these statements for any reason. These forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these statements. These factors include the matters discussed in the section titled “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 25, 2010 and in the section titled “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. You should carefully consider the numerous risks and uncertainties described under these sections.

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Unless expressly stated or the context otherwise requires, the terms “we,” “our,” “us” and “FormFactor” refer to FormFactor, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

 

Overview

 

We design, develop, manufacture, sell and support precision, high performance advanced semiconductor wafer probe card products and solutions. Semiconductor manufacturers use our wafer probe cards to perform wafer sort and test on the semiconductor die, or chips, on the whole semiconductor wafer, which is prior to singulation of the wafer into individual separate chips. We work closely with our customers on product design, as each wafer probe card is a custom product that is specific to the chip and wafer designs of the customer and to certain other semiconductor test equipment used by the customer. During wafer sort and test, a wafer probe card is mounted on a prober and connected to a semiconductor tester. The wafer probe card is used as an interface to connect electrically with and test individual chips on a wafer. Our wafer probe cards are used by our customers in the front end of the semiconductor manufacturing process, as are our image sensor and parametric probe cards. We operate in a single industry segment and have derived substantially all of our revenues from the sale of wafer probe cards incorporating our proprietary technology, including our MicroSpring® interconnect technology and our ATRETM wafer test technology.

 

22



Table of Contents

 

During the nine months ended September 24, 2011, we saw revenue decline over the same period in fiscal 2010 across our DRAM and Flash product markets. Our revenues decreased by 3.8%, or $5.5 million, in the nine months ended September 24, 2011 as compared to the same period in fiscal 2010, but increased by 10.1%, or $4.8 million, in the three months ended September 24, 2011 as compared to the same period in fiscal 2010. The decline in the nine month period is attributed primarily to lost business opportunities due to an extended qualification period for our SmartMatrix platform at certain customers, as well as changing order patterns for our NAND Flash products. However, this revenue decline was partially offset by overall demand increases in our SOC product.  The increase in revenues for the three month period is attributed to increased sales of our SmartMatrix product family as we continue to qualify certain customers.  This increase was partially offset by reduced demand for our NAND Flash products.

 

We incurred a net loss of $9.9 million in the third quarter of fiscal 2011 as compared to a net loss of $95.8 million for the third quarter of fiscal 2010. The reduction in net loss quarter over quarter is primarily attributable to the enterprise-wide impairment of $52.0 million recorded in the third quarter of fiscal 2010, as well as a reduction in depreciation resulting from this enterprise-wide impairment.  Net loss also decreased quarter over quarter due to the restructuring actions undertaken throughout 2010, the purpose of which was to simplify our overall structure and better align our operations with the current business environment, streamline our manufacturing structure and reduce both manufacturing cost and cycle times.  The net loss for the third quarter of fiscal 2011 includes restructuring charges of $0.3 million and impairment charges of $0.1 million.  The net loss for the third quarter of fiscal 2010 included $8.5 million of restructuring charges and total impairment charges for certain long-lived assets of $55.4 million.

 

We incurred a net loss of $39.0 million for the first nine months of fiscal 2011 as compared to $167.9 million in the first nine months of fiscal 2010. The reduction in net loss period over period is primarily attributable to the factors discussed above with respect to the net loss reduction for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 as compared to the same period of fiscal 2010.

 

Our cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities totaled approximately $316.0 million as of September 24, 2011, as compared to $347.2 million at December 25, 2010. While there are no specific significant transactions or arrangements that are likely to materially affect liquidity, economic uncertainty and weak credit markets are driving our customers to delay procurement and payment decisions which may adversely impact our cash collections. We believe that we will be able to satisfy our working capital requirements for the next twelve months with the liquidity provided by our existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities. If we are unsuccessful in improving our operating efficiency, reducing our cash outlays or increasing our available cash through financing, our cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities will further decline in fourth quarter of fiscal 2011 and in future fiscal quarters.

 

We believe the following information is important to understanding our business, our financial statements and the remainder of this discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations:

 

Revenues.  We derive substantially all of our revenues from product sales of wafer probe cards. Revenues from our customers are subject to fluctuations due to factors including, but not limited to, design cycles, technology adoption rates, competitive pressure to reduce prices, cyclicality of the different end markets into which our customers’ products are sold and market conditions in the semiconductor industry. Historically, increases in revenues have resulted from increased demand for our existing products, the introduction of new, more complex products and the penetration of new markets. We expect that revenues from the sale of wafer probe cards will continue to account for substantially all of our revenues for the foreseeable future.

 

Cost of Revenues. Cost of revenues consists primarily of manufacturing materials, payroll, shipping and handling costs and manufacturing-related overhead. Our manufacturing operations rely upon a limited number of suppliers to provide key components and materials for our products, some of which are a sole source. We order materials and supplies based on backlog and forecasted customer orders. Tooling and setup costs related to changing manufacturing lots at our suppliers are also included in the cost of revenues. We expense all warranty costs and inventory provisions as cost of revenues.

 

We design, manufacture and sell custom advanced wafer probe cards into the semiconductor test market, which is subject to significant variability and demand fluctuations. Our wafer probe cards are complex products that are custom to a specific chip design of a customer and must be delivered on relatively short lead-times as compared to our overall manufacturing process. As our advanced wafer probe cards are manufactured in low volumes and must be delivered on relatively short lead-times, it is not uncommon for us to acquire production materials and start certain production activities based on estimated production yields and forecasted demand prior to or in excess of actual demand for our wafer probe cards. We record an adjustment to our inventory valuation for estimated obsolete and non-saleable inventories based on assumptions about future demand, changes to manufacturing processes and overall market conditions.

 

Research and Development.  Research and development expenses include expenses related to product development, engineering and material costs. Almost all research and development costs are expensed as incurred. We plan to continue to invest in research and development activities to improve and enhance existing technologies and to develop new technologies for current and new markets and for new applications.

 

23



Table of Contents

 

Selling, General and Administrative.  Selling, general and administrative expenses include expenses related to sales, marketing, and administrative personnel, provision for doubtful accounts, internal and outside sales representatives’ commissions, market research and consulting, and other sales, marketing, and administrative activities. These expenses also include costs for protecting and enforcing our patent rights and regulatory compliance costs.

 

Restructuring Charges. Restructuring charges include costs related to employee termination benefits and cost of long-lived assets abandoned or impaired, as well as contract termination costs.

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets.  Asset impairment charges include charges associated with the write down of assets that have no future expected benefit or assets for which circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of these assets may not be recoverable, as well as adjustments to the carrying amount of our assets held for sale.

 

Use of Estimates. The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Estimates may change as new information is obtained. Significant items that are subject to such estimates include the fair value of revenue elements, fair value of marketable securities, allowance for doubtful accounts, reserves for product warranty, valuation of obsolete and slow moving inventory, valuation of our long-lived assets, the assessment of recoverability of long-lived assets, valuation and recognition of stock-based compensation, provision for income taxes and valuation allowance for deferred tax assets and tax liabilities and accruals for other liabilities.

 

24



Table of Contents

 

Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth our operating results as a percentage of revenues for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

2011

 

2010

 

Revenues

 

100.0

%

100.0

%

100.0

%

100.0

%

Cost of revenues

 

77.0

 

115.2

 

81.4

 

103.9

 

Gross profit (loss)

 

23.0

 

(15.2

)

18.6

 

(3.9

)

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

20.0

 

27.1

 

23.6

 

30.4

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

21.5

 

34.3

 

25.0

 

36.5

 

Restructuring charges, net

 

0.5

 

18.0

 

0.1

 

10.1

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

0.2

 

117.0

 

0.3

 

39.0

 

Total operating expenses

 

42.2

 

196.4

 

49.0

 

116.0

 

Operating loss

 

(19.2

)

(211.6

)

(30.4

)

(119.9

)

Interest income, net

 

0.6

 

1.3

 

0.8

 

1.5

 

Other income (expense), net

 

(0.1

)

8.4

 

0.1

 

2.8

 

Loss before income taxes

 

(18.7

)

(201.9

)

(29.5

)

(115.6

)

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

 

0.3

 

0.5

 

(1.5

)

0.5

 

Net loss

 

(19.0

)%

(202.4

)%

(28.0

)%

(116.1

)%

 

Three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 and September 25, 2010:

 

Revenues

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

September 24,

 

September 25,

 

 

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

% Change

 

2011

 

2010

 

% Change

 

 

 

(In thousands, except percentages)

 

Revenues by Market:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRAM

 

$

36,496

 

$

30,069

 

21.4

%

$

97,295

 

$

104,227

 

(6.7

)%

Flash

 

7,329

 

9,026

 

(18.8

)

18,789

 

20,920

 

(10.2

)

SOC

 

8,290

 

8,252

 

0.5

 

23,017

 

19,506

 

18.0

 

Total revenues

 

$

52,115

 

$

47,347

 

10.1

%

$

139,101

 

$

144,653

 

(3.8

)%

 

Revenues for the three months ended September 24, 2011 increased 10.1%, or $4.8 million, while revenues for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 decreased 3.8%, or $5.5 million, compared to the revenues of the comparable periods of the prior year. The three month comparable increase is primarily due to increased volume of shipments of advanced wafer probe cards for the DRAM memory market segment.  The nine month comparable decrease is primarily associated with lower DRAM and Flash sales in our second fiscal quarter.

 

Our revenues for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 were primarily generated by sales of wafer probe cards to manufacturers of DRAM devices.  DRAM sales were higher in the three months ended September 24, 2011 as compared to the same period in the prior year primarily due to increased volumes of SmartMatrix products purchased by certain customers and platform qualifications at certain customers in the second fiscal quarter of 2011.  Despite a 21% increase in DRAM sales in the comparable three month period, revenues for the nine months ended September 24, 2011 were 7% lower than the comparable period, as extended qualification periods for the SmartMatrix product family led to reduced revenues in the second fiscal quarter of 2011.

 

Revenues from sales to Flash memory device manufacturers decreased in the three and nine months ended September 24, 2011 compared to the same periods in the prior year. The decrease was driven primarily by a significant decrease in the sale of NAND Flash wafer probe cards related to the timing of customer orders and a reduction in short-term demand with certain of our customers.

 

Revenues from sales to SOC device manufacturers were flat for the three months ended September 24, 2011 compared to the previous year.  Revenues from sales to SOC device manufacturers increased in the nine months ended September 24, 2011 compared to the same periods in the prior year, primarily due to the growth in the overall SOC device market and continued market trends in favor of more complex devices and the higher parallelism offered by SOC devices, which positively impacted revenues from sales of our wafer probe cards in this market.

 

25



Table of Contents

 

Revenues by Geographic Region

 

The following table sets forth our revenues by geographic region for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 24,

 

% of

 

September 25,

 

% of

 

September 24,

 

% of

 

September 25,

 

% of

 

 

 

2011

 

Revenue

 

2010

 

Revenue

 

2011

 

Revenue

 

2010

 

Revenue

 

 

 

(In thousands, except percentages)

 

Taiwan

 

$

9,883

 

18.9

%

$

17,812

 

37.6

%

$

44,251

 

31.8

%

$

54,838

 

37.9

%

Japan

 

11,664

 

22.4

 

7,655

 

16.2

 

24,881

 

17.9

 

24,496

 

16.9

 

North America

 

7,033

 

13.5

 

7,889

 

16.6

 

20,388

 

14.7

 

27,900

 

19.3

 

South Korea

 

16,767

 

32.2

 

7,663

 

16.2

 

33,385

 

24.0

 

19,103

 

13.2

 

Asia Pacific (1)

 

5,153

 

9.9

 

4,777

 

10.1

 

11,009

 

7.9

 

12,110

 

8.4

 

Europe

 

1,615

 

3.1

 

1,551

 

3.3

 

5,187

 

3.7

 

6,206

 

4.3

 

Total revenues

 

$

52,115

 

100.0

%

$

47,347

 

100.0

%

$

139,101

 

100.0

%

$

144,653